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  #11  
Old 06-05-2019, 09:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ban617 View Post
Isnít the factory positive wire to the coil a resistor wire ? If so using a resistor would lower the voltage more ...
Yes......the factory distributor wire is a resistor wire which is about 8 volts.....I didnít know that until yesterday.....lol. The Mallory coil needs anywhere from 6-9 volts.....so the 1.6 resistor was still within tolerance, I believe?

I HAD a Mallory Hyfire CDI box installed at one time. I eliminated it because I was trying to do a process of elimination to locate my issue. So actually, the CDI box was supposed to be getting 12 volts but was really only getting 8 volts.....through the factory resistor wire.

So when I was still having issues, I purchased the new Unilite distributor, I read that it needs a 1.6 ohm resistor.....which I installed. Technically, I didnít need that as the factory wire was already at 8 volts.....but again, I didnít know that. So when I bypassed the resistor wire and went directly from the battery to the coil....everything was in normal condition.

I will be reinstalling the Mallory Hyfire CDI box which will need 12 volts. So I ordered a new engine wire harness from America Auto Wire that will have the correct 12 volts to the CDI box. If I need to lower the volts, I can reinstall the resistor directly to the coil.

Kurt
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  #12  
Old 06-05-2019, 10:51 PM
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See, just as I had said.... I knew all along you would figure it out

Dan
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Old 06-05-2019, 11:47 PM
Steve Shauger Steve Shauger is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 69 Post Sedan View Post
Yes......the factory distributor wire is a resistor wire which is about 8 volts.....I didnít know that until yesterday.....lol. The Mallory coil needs anywhere from 6-9 volts.....so the 1.6 resistor was still within tolerance, I believe?

I HAD a Mallory Hyfire CDI box installed at one time. I eliminated it because I was trying to do a process of elimination to locate my issue. So actually, the CDI box was supposed to be getting 12 volts but was really only getting 8 volts.....through the factory resistor wire.

So when I was still having issues, I purchased the new Unilite distributor, I read that it needs a 1.6 ohm resistor.....which I installed. Technically, I didnít need that as the factory wire was already at 8 volts.....but again, I didnít know that. So when I bypassed the resistor wire and went directly from the battery to the coil....everything was in normal condition.

I will be reinstalling the Mallory Hyfire CDI box which will need 12 volts. So I ordered a new engine wire harness from America Auto Wire that will have the correct 12 volts to the CDI box. If I need to lower the volts, I can reinstall the resistor directly to the coil.

Kurt

Just to add, when you are starting the engine key in start position and starter turning the resistor wire in the harness is bypassed and the coil receives full12 volts. After you release the key to the run position (engine running) the resistor power wire applies the reduced voltage 8 ish volts. Basically you get a hotter spark on startup and once running reduced to preserve the point s
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  #14  
Old 06-07-2019, 04:11 AM
Kurt S Kurt S is offline
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btw, the point of the resistor isn't to reduce the voltage, it's to limit the current that the coil sees.
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Old 06-07-2019, 12:34 PM
Steve Shauger Steve Shauger is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kurt S View Post
btw, the point of the resistor isn't to reduce the voltage, it's to limit the current that the coil sees.

You are technically correct, but it's easier to measure the voltage drop. Obviously the voltage drop represents a reduction in current. In simple terms voltage is pressure and current is flow. If you decrease the pressure(voltage), flow (current) is decreased.
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